White City- 1st step toward incorporation

Map of boundries to be considered as White City begins the process to incorporate. This does not mean this is the boundary that will be selected. First must come an Economic Feasibility Study to determine if the city could support itself and how that would occur.
Map of boundries to be considered as White City begins the process to incorporate. This does not mean this is the boundary that will be selected. First must come an Economic Feasibility Study to determine if the city could support itself and how that would occur.

White City is headed toward incorporation, but they don’t anticipate placing it on the ballot until November 2010.
    
Incorporation is one of the issues that can only be voted on in even number years at a general election. While the 30 or so people attending a meeting Jan. 16 wanted the issue on the November 08 ballot, spokesperson Joy Reich said after studying the many requirements that date did not seem feasible.  It was agreed work would start immediately with a number still hoping they could see incorporation on the November 08 ballot.


First steps were taken last week when those in attendance supported a
boundary that far exceeds the current urban renewal area and excludes
the industrial area to the west of Highway 62. That exclusion came as a
result of a state law specific to White City that remains in effect
until 2016.  The boundary does include the Cascade Shopping Center and
other retail type businesses along Highway 62.
   
Three
boundary options were available for consideration. All were different
from the current urban renewal boundaries. Option A included 2,236
acres; Option B1 has a gross of 2976 acres and Option B2 has 3285 gross
acres. The gross figures includes roads.  Eagle Point encompasses
approximately 2000 gross acres, according to Eagle Point planner Bunny
Lincoln.
   
Participants overwhelmingly selected Option B2. The accompanying map provides the basic boundaries.
   
Several committees were appointed in order to begin the involved incorporation process.
   
The
first step is to raise the funds, which based on recent incorporations
in Oregon will probably run in the neighborhood of $200,000. An
Economic Feasibility Study, which requires professional management,
will be the first and most expensive part of the plan. Once completed,
the plan will provide a proposed budget from which a permanent tax rate
will be available. That budget will include a minimum of four services.
The plan needs to indicate that the proposed city  plan for residential
development is at or above the same urban density planned for an
existing city within the county. 
By Nancy Leonard
Of the Independent

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