Wind, rain and snow give southern Oregonians something to talk about and alot to clean up

This house in Butte Falls was fortunately emp;ty when it received this final blow. The house in woned by Dennis and Roni Burg. This and many other homes were damaged in the Butte Falls area.
This house in Butte Falls was fortunately emp;ty when it received this final blow. The house in woned by Dennis and Roni Burg. This and many other homes were damaged in the Butte Falls area.

The storm that hit the valley starting Friday, Jan. 4 continued to leave its mark a week later.  An avalanche at the south entrance on Highway 62 blocked access to Crater Lake National Park. The north entrance is always closed during the winter and  until the 300 ft. avalanche is cleared, there is no getting in or out of the park. At the end of last week, Crater Lake measured about 100 inches of snow, or just over eight feet.


At the south end of the valley, Mt. Ashland surely went down in the record books as some six feet of snow fell in about 2 ½ days. And, while that looks good for the fiuture, it was anything but good for employees and would be skiers and snowboards last week. As the mountain was closed for several days.


A phone call last Thursday from the Tompsons on Elk Creek indicated they had been without power for five days and without a phone for four days. They were still snowed in.


There were two hour delays through most of the valley on Monday and several districts were forced to close. For one or two days.


Prospect residents were without power until late Sunday evening.


Lake Creek and Butte Falls appeared to have been the most affected by the storm, primarily the wind.
The accompanying photos show damage to Butte Falls area homes and to Butte Falls elementary where water stood in the school gym as a result of a tree knocking a hole in the roof.

By Nancy Leonard
Of the Independent 

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