Original EP Museum structure has history all its own

Former Long Mountain School students. Back row: Grace Holman Goren Armstrong, only student to have attended the school before it was moved into Eagle Point; and Aloha Boren Adams, Jack Greb, Pete Jackson and Ted Daw. Front row: Irene Peterson Long, Dorothey Carlson Farley and Lena Tibbits Crider.
Former Long Mountain School students. Back row: Grace Holman Goren Armstrong, only student to have attended the school before it was moved into Eagle Point; and Aloha Boren Adams, Jack Greb, Pete Jackson and Ted Daw. Front row: Irene Peterson Long, Dorothey Carlson Farley and Lena Tibbits Crider.

(Editor’s note- Information for this articles comes from History of Eagle Point School District by Clarence f. Davies.)    
Long Mountain School District was formed out of the west portion of the Eagle Point District on Dec. 17, 1865 and bore the name of Rogue River District. While it had a legal description, the one folks understood said, "the point of beginning lay a few rods south of the Antelope Road that leaves Crater Lake Highway in White City. In running north, it will cross the highway between the homes of Steve Wilson and Spike Mallory. It proceeds north along the east side of Tim Dugan’s place, up over the mountain, to a point about a quarter of a mile south of Dodge Bridge. In that area, the line will run about half way between the Rogue River and the Crater Lake Highway."
 

The first school house anyone knows about lay on the swale between Long
Mountain and Englehardt’s Butte, but this was later transferred to a
point where the Long Mountain Road, rising from Little Butte Creek,
reaches the flat above and angles to the east. It was a nice little
building for its time and served the district well until the
consolidation movement in 1945. Although no school had been held there
after 1936, it was well kept and was moved over to Eagle Point to serve
as a classroom when the consolidated district was getting under way and
badly needed housing. It was later skidded down near the teacher’s
cottages where it served as a dressing room for the athletic field for
a while and then as a general storehouse.
   
Long Mountain
became part of the Eagle Point School District at the same time Glenn
D. Hale became superintendent, which was in 1944.
   
About
1945-46 it was necessary to expand the high school. A bond of $19,000
and a proposal ro raise another $10,000 was endorsed without a
dissenting vote. Work began. And even in that day and age construction
cost more than they had budgeted for, so they decided to move the Long
Mountain building over and put it to use. It served for years for a
variety of purposes and later was moved down near the garage to service
for general storage and a field house for athletics.
   
The
building, which serves as the anchor and entrance to the Eagle Point
Museum could tell many a tale if only those old boards could do more
than squeak.

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