One of two OHSU assisting in D9, also assists in Amazon

Mission boat, ?Mensageiro da Paz? (Messenger of Peace.) They are praying for a bigger boat to be able to take missionary teams to the villages along with the medical teams.
Mission boat, ?Mensageiro da Paz? (Messenger of Peace.) They are praying for a bigger boat to be able to take missionary teams to the villages along with the medical teams.

District 9 has the benefit of nursing students from the Oregon Health Sciences University School of Nursing for the second year.
    
Kristin Gannett and Marcos Corderio are seniors in the bachelor of science nursing program and are in the district working with JR, the school nurse, following up on work done last year by OHSU nursing students.


The American Heart Association recommends comparisons of weight,
height, gender and age with blood pressure and body weight index. This
will done at Eagle Point and White City Middle Schools. If some are
found to be thought at risk with cardio-vascular issues, there will be
a followup to see if education is needed regarding diet and exercise or
if the student should be connected with a primary care provider.
   
Exercise
can reduce blood pressure as much as 20 percent, according to a survey.
This year they have added a test for scoliosis in girls.
   
The
data will be gathered at White Mountain Middle School on Oct. 29, 30
and 31 and at Eagle Point Middle School, Nov. 5,6 and 7.
   
Gannett
and Corderio will take the lead role in the testing and will have nine
sophomore nursing students each day assisting them. 
   
Parents
can expect a letter a week before the tests, which only needs to be
returned if they do not want their child to participate.
   
Students
will be asked to fill out a simple survey. No names, only student ID
numbers, will be used. Questions will ask how often a student
exercises, how much time is spent watching TV and playing computer
games, how often the student eats out and how often vegetables and
fruit are eaten.
   
Results of the testing will be sent home to parents a few weeks after they are completed.
   
Gannett
and Corderio will be working with JR through the first week in
December. Another team of nurses will come to the district in the
spring to follow up on the work, focusing on those students considered
as potentially high health risks.
   
Last year Gannett spent
time in Shady Cove and learned about the drug problem in the community
and with youth. As a direct result of her work, OnTrack is now at the
Shady Cove school each Thursday to work with students.
   
When
she graduates, Gannett will spend three years at Rogue Valley Medical
Center. She received a scholarship through Asante with the condition
that she work there after graduation. She hopes to become a nurse
practitioner.
   
Corderio also hopes to become a nurse
practitioner, but his story is a bit different. His parents are
missionaries in the Amazon and are also dentists. That is where
Corderio grew up.
When he was quite young, the Vineyard Church in
Grants Pass began visiting, serving the area on an annual basis. As the
years went by, Corderio expressed to the Vineyard group his desire to
become a nurse practitioner.
   
Corderio came to Grants Pass
6 ½ years ago under the sponsorship of the church. He tells his initial
experience with the English language. He could not speak a single word
of English when he arrived. The Vineyard minister taught him one word
"yes." So the first Sunday in church, people wanted to show their
friendliness and invited him to dinner. As each family approached him,
he smiled, shook hands and said "yes."  That evening as the minister’s
family sat down to dinner, the phone started ringing. Each caller asked
where Marcos was, they were waiting for him to join them for dinner. He
quickly learned more than one word in English and, in fact, speaks it
very well.
   
Each summer Marcos takes a team to the Amazon for
two weeks. One of his instructors has become so interested in what he
and his family do, that she will be going as part of the 2009 team. He
stays there for about nine weeks. The natives have absolutely no money,
so there is no financial reward for any medical services. Each year
Corderio takes enough supplies to pull 200 to 300 teeth and to do 20 to
30 dentures. Corderio hopes to get a larger boat in order to have a
clinic on the boat.
By Nancy Leonard
Of the Independent

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